The FRA’s controversial “LGBT Survey” fails to convince Member States

LGBT-europe-surveyIn a meeting of the EU Council’s Working Party on Social Affairs this Monday, Member States discussed a document entitled “Response to the Commission’s List of actions to advance LGBTI equality – Draft Council Conclusions”.

For those able and willing to read between the lines, the document is a slap on the face of the EU’s controversial Fundamental Rights Agency.

The document originally drafted by the Dutch Presidency contained this passage:

“According to a survey conducted by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA), LGBT persons in the EU face obstacles to enjoying their fundamental rights and are often discriminated against, particularly in areas such as employment, education and access to goods and services. The survey also shows that many LGBT persons are subjected to violence and harassment, frequently in public places. However, cases of discrimination, violence and harassment are rarely reported to the police or other authorities by the victims.”

But following criticism from other Member States the Dutch Presidency had to withdraw this language even prior to the meeting of the working group, and replace it with a revised version that says the following:

“According to a survey conducted by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA), LGBT persons in the EU face obstacles to enjoying their fundamental rights and are often discriminated against […]. The survey also suggests that many LGBT persons are subjected to violence and harassment, frequently in public places. However, the survey also suggests that cases of discrimination, violence and harassment are rarely reported to the police or other authorities by the victims.”

In other words, the Member States consider that the Survey fails to demonstrate what it claims it demonstrates.

It appears that our reporting on the FRA’s pseudo-scientific methodology has not remained without effect.

Readers of this blog will recall that the Survey, which was to become the basis of far-flung homo-mainstreaming policies, failed to comply even with the most basic rules of social research. In fact it was not really a survey, but rather had the character of an on-line petition, organized by the FRA at the cost of 400.000 Euro.

Given the apparent lack of reliability of the survey, the Council document:

“CALLS ON THE EUROPEAN UNION AGENCY FOR FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS to further study the situation of LGBTI people by compiling high-quality statistics based on the most reliable methods.

This is a polite way of saying: what the FRA has so far provided is not “high-quality”, and the methods used were not the most reliable.

It appears that the document nevertheless was not adopted, following a veto by Hungary.

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