Finland: Citizens’ Initiative collects more than 100.000 signatures against same-sex “marriage”

AA_lippu_senaatintori_kuva_Pentti_Tuovinen-1024x683The Finnish mainstream media have tried their best to avoid any mention of it, and foreign media have not reported it at all. This is also the reason why we have come across this information only with some delay and are relaying it only now: the citizens’ initiative Aito avioliitto (roughly translated: Real Marriage or Genuine Marriage) that aims to uphold marriage as a union between a man and a woman in the law and in Finnish society has collected more thean 107.000 signatures, i.e. twice as many than legally required. The Parliament is now obliged to consider the petition. Continue reading

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Finland: Petition opposing gay marriage reaches 50,000 target

A petition to reverse Finland’s gender-neutral marriage law has gathered the required 50,000 signatures to see the issue debated in parliament.

The petition, created by the “Association for Real Marriage” (Aito avioliitto) on the citizens’ initiative website kansalaisaloite.fi, had garnered the necessary amount of support by 6pm on Sunday evening. Under the terms of the citizens’ initiative scheme, the petition still had 2 and a half months remaining within which to collect the requisite number of signatures.

The document calls on parliament to reverse last year’s decision to introduce a law permitting same-sex couples to “marry”. The new marriage law is due to come into force in March 2017.

Upcoming election of judges at the European Court of Human Rights (II)

d83a4014cb3bc0cd0dc1ffa7d55be2e91Following up on our previous post, here is the outcome of the hearing of candidates conducted by the PACE Committee on the Election of Judges to the ECtHR, as set out in a Progress Report released today. As one can see therefrom, the Committee in most cases makes rather clear recommendations, except for the Austrian candidates, where two of the three nominees rank ex aequo. However, the Parliamentary Assembly is not bound by these recommendations.

We gladly note that the radical professor on Gender Theory from Ireland has not been recommended. Sign of a renewed vigilance at PACE? Continue reading

Upcoming election of judges at the European Court of Human Rights

d83a4014cb3bc0cd0dc1ffa7d55be2e91In April 2015, the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) will elect the new judges at the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) in respect of Liechtenstein, Monaco, Ireland, Andorra, Austria and Finland. In preparation of this election, the Committee on the election of judges of the PACE will hold a meeting in Paris on 30 and 31 March to interview the three candidates nominated by each of those member States. Continue reading

Finland finally does legalize same-sex “marriages”

Leningrad_Cowboys_01President Sauli Niinistö signed and confirmed the new law which will introduce an ontologically misconstrued concept of “gender neutral” marriage  in Finland when it comes into force on March 1, 2017.

The law is remarkable also in respect to the fact that this is the first piece of legislation brought to Parliament as a citizens’ initiative, which was approved as the law of the land despite being signed only by 167.000 citizens. (For the national elections 2011 there were 4,159,857 eligible voters; the initiative was thus supported by roughly 4% of the population. For comparison: in Slovakia, which has roughly the same number of inhabitants, in a referendum three weeks ago nearly one million voted to curtail “gay rights”… but the referendum was declared void due to low voter turnout, and the gay lobby celebrated this as a victory.)

Corrigendum: Finland will not (yet) recognize same-sex “marriages”

FinnlandWe have received information from Finland that reports about new legislation on same-sex “marriage” were premature. While the Parliament has indeed with a narrow majority voted that same-sex “marriages” should be introduced, that vote was only a motion requesting the next government to prepare such a legislative proposal. There will be parliamentary elections in Finland next spring, and  if the majority of the newly elected MPs are not in favour of same-sex marriage, then it might still be possible that the proposed law will not be adopted.
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